Debate

Supervised Injection Facilities: Harm or Harm Reduction?

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                    [post_content] => Supervised injection facilities (SIFs) are increasingly being discussed in the United States as a harm reduction strategy to reduce overdose deaths in the opioid epidemic. Senator William Brownsberger writes in favor of a framework for the legal operation of supervised injection facilities (SIFs) in Massachusetts. Faiz Kidwai unpacks some common myths about these facilities. Nurse Brianne Fitzgerald questions the values of SIFs: are they enabling drug users, or simply giving up hope on them? PHP Fellow Qing Wai Wong speaks with Cory Salzillo about the California State Sheriffs’ Association's reservations on a California bill which proposes allowing for the creation of SIFs. Last, Leonard Glantz compares two health policy decisions based on moralism that led to a failure in harm reduction, arguing that moralism undermines the efforts of public health.

 

Feature image: Prepping a rig, Insite, the first legal supervised injection site in North America. Photo courtesy Vancouver Coastal Health.
                    [post_title] => Supervised Injection Facilities: Harm or Harm Reduction?
                    [post_excerpt] => Supervised injection facilities (SIFs) are increasingly being discussed in the United States as a way to reduce overdose deaths in the opioid epidemic. Here are five viewpoints on SIFs as a harm reduction strategy. 
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Supervised injection facilities (SIFs) are increasingly being discussed in the United States as a way to reduce overdose deaths in the opioid epidemic. Here are five viewpoints on SIFs as a harm reduction strategy.

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Debate

Common Ground? Prioritizing Public Health After the Election

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                    [post_content] => Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the United States on January 20, 2017. Republicans will also control the Senate and House, giving them their best opportunity to shape policy in years. At this point there are more questions than answers: What will this mean for the Affordable Care Act? For public health? For researchers? On Monday, PHP Editor-in-Chief David Jones wrote that “consensus on public health priorities is possible” and that “the upcoming fight is a crucial opportunity for public health to step up, assert its place in the broader debate about health reform, and chart a bi-partisan path to enacting policies that improve health.” We asked two public health leaders to talk about the path forward. Both were on a recent American Public Health Association panel on how to make public health a priority in 2017 (link to video).

Image: Travis Wise, Big Four Bridge, Sidney, Ohio, used under CC BY license, cropped from original
                    [post_title] => Common Ground? Prioritizing Public Health After the Election
                    [post_excerpt] => Julie Gerberding (Former CDC Director) and Mary Woolley (President of Research!America) discuss how to make health reform a priority in 2017, with America’s infrastructure as a possible point of consensus.
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Julie Gerberding (Former CDC Director) and Mary Woolley (President of Research!America) discuss how to make health reform a priority in 2017, with America’s infrastructure as a possible point of consensus.

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Debate

Part 2 of the Debate over Marijuana Legalization

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                    [post_content] => Sharon Levy, Senator Jason Lewis, and Stephen Mandile weigh in on whether marijuana should be legalized in Massachusetts for recreational use. The question is before Massachusetts voters on November 8th. Click here for part 1 of this debate in which Dr. James Gessner and Jim Borghesani offer positions. Featured image by Mark (flickr:eggrole).
                    [post_title] => Part 2 of the Debate over Marijuana Legalization
                    [post_excerpt] => We asked a few more people to weigh in on whether marijuana should be legalized in Massachusetts for recreational use. Here’s what Sen. Lewis, Dr. Sharon Levy, and veteran Stephen Mandile had to say.  
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We asked a few more people to weigh in on whether marijuana should be legalized in Massachusetts for recreational use. Here’s what Sen. Lewis, Dr. Sharon Levy, and veteran Stephen Mandile had to say.

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Debate

Making Medications Affordable

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                    [post_content] => California voters have a number of important decisions to make beyond who to elect for office. This year's ballot questions include a measure that would require actors in pornographic films to wear condoms, a $2 increase on the cigarette tax, and repealing the death penalty. Another question, Proposition 61, has to do with the prices of prescription drugs. A Yes vote would regulate prices so that state agencies can pay no more than what the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (the VA) pays for prescription drugs. We asked two health policy experts to explain why pharmaceutical prices are such a big deal and what is at stake with Proposition 61. Alan Safer provides broader context for the costs of pharmaceuticals and ideas beyond Prop 61. This is not so much a debate as a forum for two experts to look at different sides of an important issue.  Featured image: Lisa Yarost

 

 
                    [post_title] => Making Medications Affordable
                    [post_excerpt] => Warren Kaplan and Alan Sager discuss why pharmaceutical prices are so high and what can be done to bring them down. This includes a look at Califoria's vote this Tuesday on Proposition 61 which would regulate prescription drug prices so that state agencies pay no more than the VA. 
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Warren Kaplan and Alan Sager discuss why pharmaceutical prices are so high and what can be done to bring them down. This includes a look at Califoria’s vote this Tuesday on Proposition 61 which would regulate prescription drug prices so that state agencies pay no more than the VA.

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Debate

Legalize It?

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                    [post_content] => On November 8th Massachusetts voters will decide whether to legalize marijuana for recreational use. Jim Borghesani and Dr. James Gessner explain why they support or oppose question 4. If approved, it would be legal in Massachusetts to possess up to 1 ounce of marijuana in public and up to 10 ounces at home, as well as up to 12 marijuana plants per household. Similar referendums are on the ballot November 8th in Arizona, California, Maine, and Nevada. Jim Borghesani recently came to Boston University to discuss marijuana legalization with state Senator Jason Lewis. Click here to watch a video of their debate here.
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On November 8th Massachusetts voters will decide whether to legalize marijuana for recreational use. Jim Borghesani and Dr. James Gessner explain why they support or oppose question 4. If approved, it would be legal in Massachusetts to possess up to 1 ounce of marijuana in public and up to 10 ounces at home, as well as up

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