Databyte

Nurse Practitioners and Country Living

BUPHP_Post Object
(
    [model] => BUPHP_Post_Model Object
        (
            [_post:protected] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 5486
                    [post_author] => 8
                    [post_date] => 2018-09-11 05:00:26
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-09-11 09:00:26
                    [post_content] => The association of American Medical Colleges predicts a shortage of 120,000 physicians overall by the year 2030, estimating a shortfall of up to 49,300 primary care physicians in the United States. The role of nurse practitioners in the primary care setting may increase, however, as their numbers are expected to rise over the next decade. In light of these predictions, Barnes and colleagues studied the trends in nurse practitioners who practiced in rural and nonrural primary care settings between 2008 and 2016.

The researchers analyzed a dataset featuring characteristics of doctors' offices, focusing on the number of nurse practitioners, physicians, and physician assistants. As the figure above depicts, they found that the proportion of nurse practitioners as a percentage of total primary care providers grew from 17.6% to 25.2% in rural areas over the observed years. Nonrural areas also saw a growth in the presence of nurse practitioners, from 15.9% to 23%. Although physicians made up the largest proportion of providers in both rural and nonrural settings, their percentage dwindled. Further, the authors found that a greater proportion of rural practices featured nurse practitioners among their provider teams, compared to nonrural practices.

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality identifies high-functioning primary care teams as those including multidisciplinary involvement. Considering their findings, and other data documenting the high satisfaction with NP care and their lower practice costs compared to physicians, Barnes and the other researchers suggest that policymakers invest more in nurse practitioner education.

Feature image: "Rural And Nonrural Primary Care Physician Practices Increasingly Rely On Nurse Practitioners," Hilary Barnes, Michael R. Richards, Matthew D. McHugh, and Grant Martsolf, Health Affairs 37, No. 6 (2018): 908–914  doi:10.1377/hlthaff.2017.1158
                    [post_title] => Nurse Practitioners and Country Living
                    [post_excerpt] => As the American Medical Colleges predicts a shortage of physicians, the role of nurse practitioners may increase. Barnes and colleagues studied the trends in nurse practitioners who practiced in rural and nonrural primary care settings. 
                    [post_status] => publish
                    [comment_status] => closed
                    [ping_status] => closed
                    [post_password] => 
                    [post_name] => nurse-practitioners-and-country-living
                    [to_ping] => 
                    [pinged] => 
                    [post_modified] => 2018-09-11 05:03:21
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-09-11 09:03:21
                    [post_content_filtered] => 
                    [post_parent] => 0
                    [guid] => https://www.publichealthpost.org/?post_type=bu_databyte&p=5486
                    [menu_order] => 0
                    [post_type] => bu_databyte
                    [post_mime_type] => 
                    [comment_count] => 0
                    [filter] => raw
                )

            [extra_args] => Array
                (
                )

            [owner] => BUPHP_Post Object
 *RECURSION*
            [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
        )

    [view] => BUPHP_Post_View Object
        (
            [multipage] => 
            [extra_args] => Array
                (
                )

            [owner] => BUPHP_Post Object
 *RECURSION*
            [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
        )

    [extra_args] => Array
        (
        )

    [owner] => 
    [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
)

As the American Medical Colleges predicts a shortage of physicians, the role of nurse practitioners may increase. Barnes and colleagues studied the trends in nurse practitioners who practiced in rural and nonrural primary care settings.

...more
Databyte

Housing and Emergency Department Shelter

BUPHP_Post Object
(
    [model] => BUPHP_Post_Model Object
        (
            [_post:protected] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 5455
                    [post_author] => 8
                    [post_date] => 2018-08-29 06:30:44
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-08-29 10:30:44
                    [post_content] => Until recently, Massachusetts had among the top state housing assistance programs in the United States for displaced families and children. In 2012, however, the state’s housing policy underwent changes, requiring shelter-seeking families with children to provide evidence they have stayed somewhere “not meant for human habitation.” The emergency rooms offers not only safety, but also discharge papers that could count as such proof. Other eligibility criteria include having faced domestic violence, natural disasters, and no-fault eviction.

Kanak and colleagues recently observed how often children and young adults used the emergency department as shelter, comparing trends before and after the 2012 policy change. The researchers used medical records of youths below age 21 who visited a Boston hospital’s pediatric emergency room between September 2011 and Aug 2016 and complained of or were billed for homelessness.

As the figure above depicts, they found the median visits per month increased drastically from 3 visits before the policy change to 17 visits after policy change. Most of the children observed were 12 years or younger. The emergency department’s costs and total hospital charges over the 5-year period summed nearly $580,000; only about $19,000 of that amount accrued before the policy policy change.

The researchers also found that more than 8,500 emergency department hours and $200,000 of Medicaid funds was used, and they suggest that this money would have been better spent to fund housing solutions. The University of Illinois Hospital, for example, helps displaced people who continuously present to the emergency department by paying their rent.

Table: “Trends in Homeless Children and Young Adults Seeking Shelter in a Boston Pediatric Emergency Department Following State Housing Policy Changes, 2011–2016," Mia Kanak, Amanda Stewart, Robert Vinci, Shanshan Liu, Megan Sandel, American Journal of Public Health 108, no. 8 (August 1, 2018): pp. 1076-1078. DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.2018.304493
                    [post_title] => Housing and Emergency Department Shelter
                    [post_excerpt] => Kanak and colleagues observed how often children and young adults used the emergency department as shelter before and after a 2012 policy change.
                    [post_status] => publish
                    [comment_status] => closed
                    [ping_status] => closed
                    [post_password] => 
                    [post_name] => housing-and-emergency-department-shelter
                    [to_ping] => 
                    [pinged] => 
                    [post_modified] => 2018-08-30 16:39:51
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-08-30 20:39:51
                    [post_content_filtered] => 
                    [post_parent] => 0
                    [guid] => https://www.publichealthpost.org/?post_type=bu_databyte&p=5455
                    [menu_order] => 0
                    [post_type] => bu_databyte
                    [post_mime_type] => 
                    [comment_count] => 0
                    [filter] => raw
                )

            [extra_args] => Array
                (
                )

            [owner] => BUPHP_Post Object
 *RECURSION*
            [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
        )

    [view] => BUPHP_Post_View Object
        (
            [multipage] => 
            [extra_args] => Array
                (
                )

            [owner] => BUPHP_Post Object
 *RECURSION*
            [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
        )

    [extra_args] => Array
        (
        )

    [owner] => 
    [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
)

Kanak and colleagues observed how often children and young adults used the emergency department as shelter before and after a 2012 policy change.

...more
Databyte

Drug Arrests Before and After Prop 47

BUPHP_Post Object
(
    [model] => BUPHP_Post_Model Object
        (
            [_post:protected] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 5346
                    [post_author] => 8
                    [post_date] => 2018-07-26 07:00:00
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-26 11:00:00
                    [post_content] => In 2014, Californians passed Proposition 47, a ballot initiative that reduced certain drug-related felonies to misdemeanors. Prop 47 also focused money and resources on more serious offenses while investing the savings into treatment for substance use disorders.

Alyssa Mooney and colleagues used data from the California Department of Justice’s Monthly Arrests and Citations Register and the American Community Survey to look at both total drug-related arrests and differences due to race and ethnicity on drug-related arrests before and after the passage of Prop 47.

The figure above shows both total drug arrests (left graph) and felony drug arrests (right graph) in California before and after Prop 47 was implemented. The dashed lines show expected arrest rates if Prop 47 had not passed.

There was an immediate drop in felony arrests after Prop 47 passage. Black individuals did not gain the full benefit of the felony to misdemeanor change because certain drug offenses, such as drug selling, were not reclassified, disproportionately affecting this group.

Graphs from "Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Arrests for Drug Possession After California Proposition 47, 2011–2016"
Alyssa C. Mooney, Eric Giannella, M. Maria Glymour, Torsten B. Neilands, Meghan D. Morris, Jacqueline Tulsky, and May Sudhinaraset, Am J Public Health. 2018;108:987– 993. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2018.304445
                    [post_title] => Drug Arrests Before and After Prop 47
                    [post_excerpt] => New research looked at total drug-related arrests, and differences due to race and ethnicity on drug-related arrests, before and after the passage of Proposition 47.
                    [post_status] => publish
                    [comment_status] => closed
                    [ping_status] => closed
                    [post_password] => 
                    [post_name] => drug-arrests-before-and-after-prop-47
                    [to_ping] => 
                    [pinged] => 
                    [post_modified] => 2018-07-26 07:31:39
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-26 11:31:39
                    [post_content_filtered] => 
                    [post_parent] => 0
                    [guid] => https://www.publichealthpost.org/?post_type=bu_databyte&p=5346
                    [menu_order] => 0
                    [post_type] => bu_databyte
                    [post_mime_type] => 
                    [comment_count] => 0
                    [filter] => raw
                )

            [extra_args] => Array
                (
                )

            [owner] => BUPHP_Post Object
 *RECURSION*
            [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
        )

    [view] => BUPHP_Post_View Object
        (
            [multipage] => 
            [extra_args] => Array
                (
                )

            [owner] => BUPHP_Post Object
 *RECURSION*
            [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
        )

    [extra_args] => Array
        (
        )

    [owner] => 
    [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
)

New research looked at total drug-related arrests, and differences due to race and ethnicity on drug-related arrests, before and after the passage of Proposition 47.

...more
Databyte

Infant Mortality and Medicaid Expansion

BUPHP_Post Object
(
    [model] => BUPHP_Post_Model Object
        (
            [_post:protected] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 5312
                    [post_author] => 8
                    [post_date] => 2018-07-20 05:30:51
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-20 09:30:51
                    [post_content] => Medicaid funds many maternal and child health care services in the United States, including 45% of births. Since the Affordable Care Act was implemented in 2014, 34 states have opted to expand their Medicaid programs. But some of the states with the largest proportions—54% to 72%—of births covered by Medicaid did not expand. As of 2016, several of those states, including Alabama and Mississippi, had the highest rates of infant mortality in the country at about 7.4 to 9.1 infant deaths for every 1000 live births.

Bhatt and Beck-Sagué compared infant death rates between states that expanded Medicaid coverage and those that did not. Average death rates among all infants decreased in states that expanded Medicaid, and increased in states that did not.

As shown in the Figure, Black infant mortality decreased overall from 2010 to 2015, but twice as much in Medicaid expansion states (a difference of 1.7 deaths per 1000 live births) compared to non-expansion states (a difference of 0.8 deaths per 1000 live births).

The researchers call for studies to further identify reasons why Medicaid expansion states had better infant outcomes, and what barriers to child health may exist in non-expansion states.

Graphic from "Medicaid Expansion and Infant Mortality in the United States," Chintan B. Bhatt and Consuelo M. Beck-Sagué, American Journal of Public Health, April 2018, Vol 108, No. 4. SupplementsDOI: 10.2105/AJPH.2017.304218.
                    [post_title] => Infant Mortality and Medicaid Expansion
                    [post_excerpt] => Average death rates among all infants decreased in states that expanded Medicaid coverage, and increased in states that did not.
                    [post_status] => publish
                    [comment_status] => closed
                    [ping_status] => closed
                    [post_password] => 
                    [post_name] => infant-mortality-and-medicaid-expansion
                    [to_ping] => 
                    [pinged] => 
                    [post_modified] => 2018-07-18 07:48:36
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-18 11:48:36
                    [post_content_filtered] => 
                    [post_parent] => 0
                    [guid] => https://www.publichealthpost.org/?post_type=bu_databyte&p=5312
                    [menu_order] => 0
                    [post_type] => bu_databyte
                    [post_mime_type] => 
                    [comment_count] => 0
                    [filter] => raw
                )

            [extra_args] => Array
                (
                )

            [owner] => BUPHP_Post Object
 *RECURSION*
            [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
        )

    [view] => BUPHP_Post_View Object
        (
            [multipage] => 
            [extra_args] => Array
                (
                )

            [owner] => BUPHP_Post Object
 *RECURSION*
            [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
        )

    [extra_args] => Array
        (
        )

    [owner] => 
    [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
)

Average death rates among all infants decreased in states that expanded Medicaid coverage, and increased in states that did not.

...more
Databyte

Clarifying Medical Bankruptcy

BUPHP_Post Object
(
    [model] => BUPHP_Post_Model Object
        (
            [_post:protected] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 5309
                    [post_author] => 8
                    [post_date] => 2018-07-19 06:30:40
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-19 10:30:40
                    [post_content] => Medical bankruptcy is a much-debated topic, with most questions focused on exactly how many people file for it and how often it occurs. In 2005, Elizabeth Warren and her colleagues found medical costs led to over 40% of bankruptcies in the United States. This was followed by an update in 2009, pushing the proportion of bankruptcies due to medical expenses to 62%.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s 2014 report conflicts with this, citing that less than 1% of US adults file for bankruptcy even though 20% of the population has great medical debt. A group of economists recently reexamined this issue, concerned that the discrepancies in statistics were causing a misunderstanding of the problem. They studied a group of patients at a California hospital and looked at how hospital visits related to bankruptcy timing.

The image above shows an increase in people filing for bankruptcy after hospitalization, particularly between one and four years after admission. The researchers suggest that paying for medical bills out of pocket, and losing income because of missed work are key reasons people file for personal bankruptcy. The graph also shows, however, that only 4% of the bankruptcies were related to hospitalization, an association of much smaller magnitude than previously understood.

Warren and colleagues critiqued the economists’ research, stating that focusing only on hospitalization does not account for other medical experiences and expenses like spending time and money in emergency departments, and paying for chronic illness treatments. The economists’ subsequent response argued that estimating a causal relationship requires focusing on an isolated factor, like hospitalization.

Graph from New England Journal of Medicine, "Myth and Measurement — The Case of Medical Bankruptcies" by Carlos Dobkin, Amy Finkelstein, Raymond Kluender, and Matthew J. Notowidigdo, March 22, 2018, N Engl J Med 2018; 378:1076-1078, DOI: 10.1056/NEJMp1716604
                    [post_title] => Clarifying Medical Bankruptcy
                    [post_excerpt] => A group of economists recently reexamined medical bankruptcy, concerned that the discrepancies in statistics were causing a misunderstanding of the problem.
                    [post_status] => publish
                    [comment_status] => closed
                    [ping_status] => closed
                    [post_password] => 
                    [post_name] => clarifying-medical-bankruptcy
                    [to_ping] => 
                    [pinged] => 
                    [post_modified] => 2018-07-19 06:20:18
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-19 10:20:18
                    [post_content_filtered] => 
                    [post_parent] => 0
                    [guid] => https://www.publichealthpost.org/?post_type=bu_databyte&p=5309
                    [menu_order] => 0
                    [post_type] => bu_databyte
                    [post_mime_type] => 
                    [comment_count] => 0
                    [filter] => raw
                )

            [extra_args] => Array
                (
                )

            [owner] => BUPHP_Post Object
 *RECURSION*
            [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
        )

    [view] => BUPHP_Post_View Object
        (
            [multipage] => 
            [extra_args] => Array
                (
                )

            [owner] => BUPHP_Post Object
 *RECURSION*
            [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
        )

    [extra_args] => Array
        (
        )

    [owner] => 
    [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
)

A group of economists recently reexamined medical bankruptcy, concerned that the discrepancies in statistics were causing a misunderstanding of the problem.

...more
Databyte

Do Americans Know the Health Impacts of Global Warming?

BUPHP_Post Object
(
    [model] => BUPHP_Post_Model Object
        (
            [_post:protected] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 5324
                    [post_author] => 8
                    [post_date] => 2018-07-17 07:00:32
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-17 11:00:32
                    [post_content] => The majority of Americans believe that global warming is real. However, citizens’ understanding of climate-driven health risks has not been described. Dr. Edward Maibach and his team conducted an online survey of US adults to measure respondents’ understanding of the impact of global warming on human health.

As shown in the Figure, survey participants were asked an open-ended question, “In your view, what health problems related to global warming are Americans currently experiencing, if any?” More than half of the 1,275 respondents didn’t provide a response or know of an answer. Eleven percent believed that no health impacts exist. Only 27% named a health-related problem. Respiratory diseases were most frequently cited as a threatened health condition (14%), followed by injuries or deaths due to extreme weather (6%), and skin cancers and other skin diseases (5%). Americans rarely identified other well-known climate-driven health problems such as the spread of insect-borne diseases, the contamination of food and water, and threats to food supplies and mental health, which may not yet be perceived to be as pervasive in the United States .

Graphic: Global warming-related health problems identified by respondents (unprompted). Author's Note on this figure in the original study: Most of the health issues listed above are projected to increase due to climate change; currently, however, we have only limited evidence that climate change will increase skin cancer, and no evidence that it will increase heart disease or other cancers. These responses might, therefore, be considered inaccurate. From The Annals of Global Health, "Do Americans Understand That Global Warming Is Harmful to Human Health? Evidence From a National Survey," Edward W. Maibach, Jennifer M. Kreslake, Connie Roser Renouf, Seth  Rosenthal, Geoff Feinberg, Anthony A. Leiserowitz, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aogh.2015.08.010
                    [post_title] => Do Americans Know the Health Impacts of Global Warming?
                    [post_excerpt] => The majority of Americans believe that global warming is real, but fewer understand the impact of global warming on health. 
                    [post_status] => publish
                    [comment_status] => closed
                    [ping_status] => closed
                    [post_password] => 
                    [post_name] => do-americans-know-the-health-impacts-global-warming
                    [to_ping] => 
                    [pinged] => 
                    [post_modified] => 2018-07-17 07:27:00
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-17 11:27:00
                    [post_content_filtered] => 
                    [post_parent] => 0
                    [guid] => https://www.publichealthpost.org/?post_type=bu_databyte&p=5324
                    [menu_order] => 0
                    [post_type] => bu_databyte
                    [post_mime_type] => 
                    [comment_count] => 0
                    [filter] => raw
                )

            [extra_args] => Array
                (
                )

            [owner] => BUPHP_Post Object
 *RECURSION*
            [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
        )

    [view] => BUPHP_Post_View Object
        (
            [multipage] => 
            [extra_args] => Array
                (
                )

            [owner] => BUPHP_Post Object
 *RECURSION*
            [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
        )

    [extra_args] => Array
        (
        )

    [owner] => 
    [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
)

The majority of Americans believe that global warming is real, but fewer understand the impact of global warming on health.

...more
Databyte

Medicaid: 2016 Uninsured Rates by County

BUPHP_Post Object
(
    [model] => BUPHP_Post_Model Object
        (
            [_post:protected] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 5278
                    [post_author] => 8
                    [post_date] => 2018-07-06 05:30:04
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-06 09:30:04
                    [post_content] => The goal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was to expand health care coverage, creating the closest thing to universal coverage the United States has ever seen. Many states increased coverage among previously uninsured residents by expanding Medicaid eligibility.  Thirty-three states and the District of Columbia have expanded Medicaid and three more are considering expansion. The thirteen remaining states are not obligated to do so, due to a Supreme Court ruling that mandatory expansion is unconstitutionally coercive.

A report published in 2018 by Bowers, Gann, and Upton, summarizes data from the 2016 US Census Bureau’s Small Area Health Insurance Estimates program. In the map on the left, states that expanded Medicaid coverage between 2015-2016 are blue. The map on the right, shows health care coverage for low-income individuals by county. Dark blue shows that more new people were covered by health insurance out of the total potential population. In states that expanded Medicaid, 23.4% of counties saw a decrease in their estimated uninsured rates (350 counties out of 1,498). This change is substantially larger than the 5.6% decrease in states that did not expand Medicaid eligibility (92 counties out of 1,643).

Within states that expanded Medicaid, the umbrella of coverage widened through the contribution of Federal Subsidies, allowing for almost 12,000 newly-eligible Americans to gain coverage.

Feature image: "Small Area Health Insurance Estimates: 2016 Small Area Estimates March 2018," Figure 3., Lauren Bowers, Carolyn Gann, and Rachel Upton
                    [post_title] => Medicaid: 2016 Uninsured Rates by County
                    [post_excerpt] => In states that expanded Medicaid, 23.4% of counties saw a decrease in their estimated uninsured rates, which is substantially larger than the decrease seen in states that did not expand Medicaid eligibility. 
                    [post_status] => publish
                    [comment_status] => closed
                    [ping_status] => closed
                    [post_password] => 
                    [post_name] => medicaid-2016-uninsured-rates-by-county
                    [to_ping] => 
                    [pinged] => 
                    [post_modified] => 2018-07-06 05:48:17
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-06 09:48:17
                    [post_content_filtered] => 
                    [post_parent] => 0
                    [guid] => https://www.publichealthpost.org/?post_type=bu_databyte&p=5278
                    [menu_order] => 0
                    [post_type] => bu_databyte
                    [post_mime_type] => 
                    [comment_count] => 0
                    [filter] => raw
                )

            [extra_args] => Array
                (
                )

            [owner] => BUPHP_Post Object
 *RECURSION*
            [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
        )

    [view] => BUPHP_Post_View Object
        (
            [multipage] => 
            [extra_args] => Array
                (
                )

            [owner] => BUPHP_Post Object
 *RECURSION*
            [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
        )

    [extra_args] => Array
        (
        )

    [owner] => 
    [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
)

In states that expanded Medicaid, 23.4% of counties saw a decrease in their estimated uninsured rates, which is substantially larger than the decrease seen in states that did not expand Medicaid eligibility. 

...more
Databyte

The Immigrant Experience in Hurricane Season

BUPHP_Post Object
(
    [model] => BUPHP_Post_Model Object
        (
            [_post:protected] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 5255
                    [post_author] => 8
                    [post_date] => 2018-07-05 07:00:23
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-05 11:00:23
                    [post_content] => Hurricane Harvey ravaged Texas in August of 2017, challenging the health care, wellbeing, and safety of Gulf Coast residents. Immigrant families felt particularly fearful that reporting property damage and losses caused by the storm would draw negative attention from authorities. This fear was heightened as Border Patrol kept checkpoints open immediately following the storm.

Earlier this year, the Kaiser Family Foundation published survey findings on the impact of Harvey on immigrants in the Texas Gulf Coast. The figure above shows that immigrants whose homes Harvey hit reported feeling more worried about seeking help for storm-related damages than their native-born counterparts. About 34% of immigrants responded that they were very worried that reaching out for help would highlight their own or a family member’s status. Only 5% of native-born residents responded similarly. Immigrants were also less likely to have flood or home insurance, or to apply for governmental disaster assistance.

Federal Emergency Management Agency’s policies do not guarantee Disaster Unemployment Assistance to undocumented individuals. Fear of disclosing immigration status may act as a barrier to help seeking and ameliorating storm damage, but such worries may be warranted.

Feature image: Kaiser Family Foundation Disparities Policy, "Hurricane Harvey: The Experiences of Immigrants Living in the Texas Gulf Coast," Bryan Wu, Liz Hamel, Mollyann Brodie, Shao-Chee Sim, and Elena Marks, Figure 6. Published: Mar 20, 2018
                    [post_title] => The Immigrant Experience in Hurricane Season
                    [post_excerpt] => Immigrant families were more fearful that reporting property damage caused by Hurricane Harvey would draw negative attention from authorities. 
                    [post_status] => publish
                    [comment_status] => closed
                    [ping_status] => closed
                    [post_password] => 
                    [post_name] => the-immigrant-experience-in-hurricane-season
                    [to_ping] => 
                    [pinged] => 
                    [post_modified] => 2018-07-05 15:04:43
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-05 19:04:43
                    [post_content_filtered] => 
                    [post_parent] => 0
                    [guid] => https://www.publichealthpost.org/?post_type=bu_databyte&p=5255
                    [menu_order] => 0
                    [post_type] => bu_databyte
                    [post_mime_type] => 
                    [comment_count] => 0
                    [filter] => raw
                )

            [extra_args] => Array
                (
                )

            [owner] => BUPHP_Post Object
 *RECURSION*
            [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
        )

    [view] => BUPHP_Post_View Object
        (
            [multipage] => 
            [extra_args] => Array
                (
                )

            [owner] => BUPHP_Post Object
 *RECURSION*
            [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
        )

    [extra_args] => Array
        (
        )

    [owner] => 
    [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
)

Immigrant families were more fearful that reporting property damage caused by Hurricane Harvey would draw negative attention from authorities.

...more
Databyte

Buckle up for Safety

BUPHP_Post Object
(
    [model] => BUPHP_Post_Model Object
        (
            [_post:protected] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 5264
                    [post_author] => 8
                    [post_date] => 2018-07-03 07:00:14
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-03 11:00:14
                    [post_content] => Nearly half of the deaths from car accidents in the United States are due to not buckling up. An estimated 2,400 lives could have been saved in 2016 if drivers and passengers had fastened their seat belts.

Back seat passengers tend to buckle their belts less often than persons sitting in the front. An average of 11% fewer back seat passengers reported wearing a seat belt compared to front seat riders.

The data in the table come from a national survey conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety / Highway Loss Data Institute. The most common reason that back seat passengers decided not to wear a seat belt was because they felt safer sitting behind the driver.

Yet back seat passengers who do not strap in are eight times more likely to sustain a serious injury in a car accident. Failure to buckle up is not just a personal risk. Unbuckled passengers become projectiles in a crash, jeopardizing the safety of everyone in the car. Other car passengers are three times as likely to be fatally injured when a passenger behind them doesn’t buckle up.

Feature image: IIHS Status Report newsletter, Vol. 52, No. 5, August 3, 2017 [post_title] => Buckle up for Safety [post_excerpt] => Back seat passengers who do not buckle their seat belts are not only more likely to sustain a serious injury in a car accident, but also to injure everyone in the car. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => seat-belts-back-seat-passengers [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-02-13 19:56:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-02-14 00:56:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.publichealthpost.org/?post_type=bu_databyte&p=5264 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => bu_databyte [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [extra_args] => Array ( ) [owner] => BUPHP_Post Object *RECURSION* [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1 ) [view] => BUPHP_Post_View Object ( [multipage] => [extra_args] => Array ( ) [owner] => BUPHP_Post Object *RECURSION* [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1 ) [extra_args] => Array ( ) [owner] => [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1 )

Back seat passengers who do not buckle their seat belts are not only more likely to sustain a serious injury in a car accident, but also to injure everyone in the car.

...more
Databyte

Pseudoscience and Abortion Policy

BUPHP_Post Object
(
    [model] => BUPHP_Post_Model Object
        (
            [_post:protected] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 4229
                    [post_author] => 8
                    [post_date] => 2018-06-29 05:30:55
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-29 09:30:55
                    [post_content] => In 2012, when US Representative Todd Akin from Missouri was asked if abortion was justified in cases of rape, he notoriously said that pregnancy as a result of rape is rare because “the female body has ways to try and shut that whole thing down.” Arguments made against abortion, like this one, are often riddled with pseudoscience.

As the map above shows, 29 states, home to 88 million women, have implemented at least two abortion restrictions not backed by scientific evidence.

For example, Texas’s “Woman’s Right to Know” booklet, offered to patients before having an abortion, uses deceptive language to lead readers to believe that abortion increases the risk of breast cancer. The Washington Post’s Fact Checker gave this claim in the booklet three “Pinocchios” on their rating scale, meaning that there was a “significant factual error” present. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists released a statement in 2009 concluding that there is “no association between induced abortion and breast cancer.”

Kentucky’s Senate Bill 5, passed in 2017, made it illegal to have an abortion after the twentieth week of pregnancy. The sponsor of the bill cited fetal pain as justification for the law, calling abortion after 20 weeks an “awful painful experience” for the fetus. However, a review of fetal pain evidence found that fetuses are unlikely to feel pain before the third trimester (around 29 weeks).

Kansas, Texas, and South Dakota have the highest number of these types of pseudoscientific restrictions with seven each.

Feature image: Guttmacher Institute, States Hostile to Abortion Rights, Policy Trends in the States, 2017
                    [post_title] => Pseudoscience and Abortion Policy
                    [post_excerpt] => Twenty-nine states, home to 88 million women, have implemented at least two abortion restrictions not backed by scientific evidence.
                    [post_status] => publish
                    [comment_status] => closed
                    [ping_status] => closed
                    [post_password] => 
                    [post_name] => pseudoscience-and-abortion-policy
                    [to_ping] => 
                    [pinged] => 
                    [post_modified] => 2018-06-26 18:44:36
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-26 22:44:36
                    [post_content_filtered] => 
                    [post_parent] => 0
                    [guid] => https://www.publichealthpost.org/?post_type=bu_databyte&p=4229
                    [menu_order] => 0
                    [post_type] => bu_databyte
                    [post_mime_type] => 
                    [comment_count] => 0
                    [filter] => raw
                )

            [extra_args] => Array
                (
                )

            [owner] => BUPHP_Post Object
 *RECURSION*
            [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
        )

    [view] => BUPHP_Post_View Object
        (
            [multipage] => 
            [extra_args] => Array
                (
                )

            [owner] => BUPHP_Post Object
 *RECURSION*
            [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
        )

    [extra_args] => Array
        (
        )

    [owner] => 
    [_trigger_error:WPLib_Base:private] => 1
)

Twenty-nine states, home to 88 million women, have implemented at least two abortion restrictions not backed by scientific evidence.

...more
1 2 3 4 5 13 14 15
SHARES